Professor Ali Ghoz

Hip Arthroscopy

Specialising in minimally invasive, cutting edge surgery

What is a hip arthroscopy?

Hip arthroscopy is a procedure which allows doctors to see into the hip joint, using a minuscule camera. A hip arthroscopy requires small incisions to be made in the skin, which allows the arthroscope (small camera) to be inserted. It can be an important method of diagnosis when investigating hip problems.

The arthroscope transmits footage from inside the hip joint to a video monitor, which is typically located in an operating theatre. This helps the surgeon to inspect the correct areas by acting as a guide. Because of the thin shape of the arthroscope itself, the need for the surgeon to make large incisions is negated. That means the recovery time following a hip arthroscopy is shorter than more invasive procedures.

Is a hip arthroscopy for me?

A hip arthroscopy is usually advised after an orthopaedic condition has not responded to non-surgical treatments like rest, physical therapy and medications.
The orthopaedic conditions which could require a hip arthroscopy to be carried out include; dysplasia, a condition which is caused by a hip socket which is abnormally shallow; femoroacetabular impingement (FAI), which is an extra bone development disorder; synovitis, a condition involving inflammation of tissues in the hip joint; snapping hip syndrome, when the tendon rubs against the joint; and loose bodies, which are bone fragments or pieces of loose cartilage which move around the joint.

The arthroscope transmits footage from inside the hip joint to a video monitor, which is typically located in an operating theatre. This helps the surgeon to inspect the correct areas by acting as a guide. Because of the thin shape of the arthroscope itself, the need for the surgeon to make large incisions is negated. That means the recovery time following a hip arthroscopy is shorter than more invasive procedures.

How does a hip arthroscopy work?

The length of the hip arthroscopy procedure will depend on the nature of the examination, and/or the work which needs to be carried out.

In consultation with your doctor, and before you enter the operating theatre, you will have the chance to ask any questions pertaining to the procedure. You will also discuss your chosen form of anaesthesia with your anaesthetist.

It is typical for your leg to be put in traction at the start pf the procedure, to allow the surgeon to work more easily. The surgeon will normally make a small puncture which is no larger than a button hole, before pumping fluid into the joint which helps visibility. The examination can then take place.

Results of a hip arthroscopy

After the issue in your hip has been examined, there are several procedures which the doctor can then perform. These include; the repair or smoothing of cartilage; trimming of bone spurs which are the result of FAI; and the removal of inflamed synovial tissue. In consultation with your doctor, and before you enter the operating theatre, you will have the chance to ask any questions pertaining to the procedure. You will also discuss your chosen form of anaesthesia with your anaesthetist.

It is typical for your leg to be put in traction at the start pf the procedure, to allow the surgeon to work more easily. The surgeon will normally make a small puncture which is no larger than a button hole, before pumping fluid into the joint which helps visibility. The examination can then take place.

Recovery from hip arthroscopy

You can expect your recovery from a hip arthroscopy to take a month or more. The recovery length will be determined by the nature of the specific procedure which has been carried out. Physical therapy can be used during the recovery period to build strength and increase range of movement. You might be advised to replace high impact exercises such as running with lower impact activities such as cycling or swimming, to ease the strain on the hip joint.

Would you like to know more about hip arthroscopy with Professor Ali Ghoz? Call today on 02039 186747 for more information.
In consultation with your doctor, and before you enter the operating theatre, you will have the chance to ask any questions pertaining to the procedure. You will also discuss your chosen form of anaesthesia with your anaesthetist.

It is typical for your leg to be put in traction at the start of the procedure, to allow the surgeon to work more easily. The surgeon will normally make a small puncture which is no larger than a button hole, before pumping fluid into the joint which helps visibility. The examination can then take place.

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