Professor Ali Ghoz

ACL Reconstruction Surgery

Specialising in minimally invasive, cutting edge surgery

Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injury

The anterior cruciate ligament – or ACL – is located in the centre of the knee that runs from femur to tibia and acts as the main stabilising ligament. If it tears it doesn’t heal and can lead to a feeling of instability in the knee.

ACL reconstruction surgery can now be performed through an arthroscopy, which is minimally invasive and yields excellent results.

When is an ACL Reconstruction Needed?

For anyone wanting to continue sporting activity or physical work, reconstruction surgery is vital, as the ACL does not heal itself due to the joint fluid preventing that outcome. A new ligament must be reconstructed therefore, using another tendon.

ACL reconstruction not only provides knee stabilisation – it also prevents further damage to the knee itself, particularly the meniscus and cartilage surfaces of the femur and tibia.

Recovery

Patients will tend to stay in hospital overnight after ACL reconstruction surgery. Even though the procedure is minimally invasive it does have an impact on the initial strength of the knee but most patients will not need a brace.

Professor Ali Ghoz advises physiotherapy as soon as possible as this will determine the speed of recovery. Patients can expect to be on crutches for around two weeks, jogging in a straight line after three months and running with pivoting in just seven months. A return to competitive sport can come as soon as 9-12 months after surgery.

With advice from physiotherapists, Professor Ghoz can provide a full ACL Reconstruction rehabilitation programme.

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